Six of the best summer gardens in Cheshire

PUBLISHED: 00:00 30 June 2014

Rode Hall

Rode Hall

not Archant

Summer is the perfect time to visit our area's finest gardens

Biddulph GrangeBiddulph Grange

Beautiful Biddulph

Biddulph Grange started as vision from James Bateman, who from 1841 spent more than 20 years collecting plants from all over the world. These were brought together at Biddulph amid rockwork, topiary, tree-stumps and a collection of eclectic garden buildings. The National Trust has now restored this Grade I listed garden to the glory of its Victorian heyday, and the garden is laid out so that visitors are led from one area to another in a journey of discovery. Don’t miss the picturesque Chinese landscape based on a Willow pattern design, the Himalayan Glen and the Italianate garden.

Admission: Adult: £7.50, child: £3.75. Free to National Trust members. Address: Biddulph Grange, Grange Road, Biddulph, Staffordshire, ST8 7SD

01782 517999, nationaltrust.org.uk/biddulph-grange-garden

 

Mount PleasantMount Pleasant

Pleasant riot of colour

Located in the heart of the rolling Cheshire countryside, near to Delamere Forest and Chester, Mount Pleasant Gardens offers visitors an opportunity to stroll through beautiful displays of traditional mixed gardens, with something new around every corner. Thousands of varieties of plants are on display, offering a riot of colour throughout the summer months. They also have a tiered garden which cascades down a sloping hillside, providing outstanding views over the Cheshire plain.

Opening: Gardens open Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday

Admission: Adult: £5 child: £1 Address: Mount Pleasant Gardens, Yeld Lane, Chester, CW6 0TB

01829 751592, mountpleasantgardens.co.uk

Rode HallRode Hall

 

Roses in full bloom

Visit Rode Hall in summer and see their fabulous rose garden in full bloom. Designed by landscape architect William Andrew Nesfield in 1860, these formal gardens are perfect for an afternoon stroll. However, the real hidden gem of Rode Hall is their kitchen garden. This walled garden, built in the 18th century, covers two acres and is a beautiful space to visit in the summer. The garden provides all the produce for the tearooms and farmers market, and also houses their award-winning gooseberries. Rode Hall head gardener, Kelvin Archer, holds the Guinness world record for the largest gooseberry.

Opening: Gardens open Tuesday-Thursday and Bank Holiday Monday. Admission: Adults £4, Children under 16 free.

Address: Rode Hall, Scholar Green, 
Cheshire, ST7 3QP. 01270 873237, rodehall.co.uk

Adlington HallAdlington Hall

 

Tranquillity at Adlington Hall

The gardens at Adlington Hall, Macclesfield, are an oasis of tranquillity, with each section offering something different. The gardens are thought to have been first landscaped in the mid-18th century by Charles Legh, whose family had lived in the hall since the early 14th century. Visit and explore the mythical Yew Maze, with a unicorn at its centre, or take a walk through the Wilderness, one of the original 18th century gardens which still include Lebanon cedars, redwoods and hornbeams from the original planting.

Opening: Gardens open each Sunday. Admission: Adults: £9 child: £5. Address: Adlington Hall, Mill Lane, Adlington, Macclesfield, SK10 4LF

01625 827595, adlingtonhall.com

Field CrestField Crest

 

Fruitful Field Crest

Christine Davies and her husband Paul have lived at Field Crest, Thornton Hough, since 2004. Set in 1.3 acres of countryside in the heart of the Wirral Peninsula, the couple wanted to create a garden that is pleasant to look out on and spend time in, but also attracts wildlife and allows them to grow fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers. Now it’s an established cottage garden and they present a varied programme of events and activities throughout the year. The garden is split into a number of separate areas, each with its own character including bold woodland, and bird and butterfly border.

Both Christine and Paul are very keen to pass on their knowledge to other people, so 2014 has seen Field Crest start a garden school.

Address: Field Crest, Thornton Common Road, Thornton Hough, Wirral, CH63 0LT. 0151 334 8878, fieldcrestgarden.co.uk

Chirk CastleChirk Castle

 

Charm at Chirk Castle

From William Emes who was commissioned to create a landscape in the early 17th century to Lady Margaret Myddelton’s tender restoration after the Second World War, Chirk Castle gardens have developed over 400 years. Lady Margaret planted various sections that are still blooming today, including the Long Border, a space with three seasonal areas filled with shrubs and herbaceous plants. Don’t miss the Hawk House, built in 1854. Originally a conservatory, Lord Howard de Walden added a thatched roof during a lease from the Myddleton family, so it could house birds of prey. An early summer highlight in the Shrub Garden is the handkerchief tree with its elegant white bracts.

Admission: Adult: £10.40, child: £5.20. Free to National Trust members

Address: Chirk Castle, Chirk, Wrexham, LL14 5AF

01691 777701, nationaltrust.org.uk/chirk-castle

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