A postcard from St Asaph - Diamond Jubilee City

PUBLISHED: 10:52 14 March 2012 | UPDATED: 21:09 20 February 2013

It is lovely to explore such spectacular scenery at St Asaph, a tranquil place of Welsh legend

It is lovely to explore such spectacular scenery at St Asaph, a tranquil place of Welsh legend.


Sitting outside a pretty pub on a sunny day, shopping and soaking up the atmosphere at this quaint village is a pleasure and so too is exploring its cathedral, the smallest in Britain.

However this 182ft long and 68ft wide building is worth visiting and its contribution to the Welsh nation has been outstanding with the translation of the Bible into Welsh by its Bishop Morgan in 1558.

The locals want it to be recognised as a small city like St Davids and will gain city status to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

It shows few scars from attacks by turbulent natives and foreign invaders including being burned by Owain Glyndwr's troops in 1402. The existing building dates back to the 14th century, but it has Victorian alterations due to remodelling by Gilbert Scott in 1867-75.


In September the town stages the North Wales International Music Festival over several venues and attracts music lovers from afar. Other events include Gala Day in August and Woodfest Wales crafts festival in July.

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