April showers make flowers, and weeds, so keep on top of your garden

PUBLISHED: 18:36 01 April 2013 | UPDATED: 21:23 05 April 2013

April showers make flowers, and weeds, so keep on top of your garden

April showers make flowers, and weeds, so keep on top of your garden

April showers make flowers, and weeds, so keep on top of your garden. PHOTOGRAPH BY Emma Louise Jones

More plants for shade
Bergenias, hostas, euphorbias, hellebores, dicentra, ferns and arum lilies

For more information on garden design visit Jacquis website
www.colourmygarden.co.uk Follow her blog: jacquibrocklehurst.wordpress.com

Our gardens have much to offer and each one can be as individual as its owner.


When planning your garden it is important to understand just what it is you want from your space. Are you a plant-a-holic eager to cram as much as you can into your borders, covering trellis and arches with a rich array of colourful plants? Or perhaps you have a more laid-back approach to the garden, appreciating it as a place to relax on a summers day.


Whatever you choose, one important factor to consider is the aspect. For sun worshippers, both plant and person, find the sunniest spot and bask in it. But for those whose gardens are often plunged into shade by large trees or buildings, all is not lost.


My own garden faces north which, according to estate agents, is not a particularly favourable aspect, south facing is much preferred. As a gardener though, I like it. It gives me an opportunity to grow a collection of plants that possess, well, shadier qualities.

Shade loving plants often grow at the edge of woodlands, blooming before the tree canopy develops then shyly retiring into the background. Lily of the valley, bluebells, scilla and wood anemone all delight in the shade. Lily of the valley has a delicious scent and can be grown in a pot, why not try growing it with trailing ivy for a delicate spring display.


For a more permanent look Buxus sempervivens or Box is perfectly happy growing in partial shade. This hardy evergreen can be trimmed into shape
and brings an attractive, formal look to a design, particularly when grown in pots. Grow with seasonal bedding such as bizzie lizzies in summer and violas in winter for a colourful display all year round.


There are even some edibles that will appreciate partial shade. Parsley and lemon balm are hardy herbs that are as useful in the kitchen as they are in the garden. Even coriander will last longer being less likely to run to send when grown in a cooler spot.

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